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Massage therapy scope of practice laws by state (N-Z)

Massage therapy scope of practice laws by state

Nebraska

http://dhhs.ne.gov/publichealth/Documents/Massage%20Therapy.pdf

38-1706. Massage therapy, defined.Massage therapy means the physical, mechanical, or electrical manipulation of soft tissue for the therapeutic purposes of enhancing muscle relaxation, reducing stress, improving circulation, or instilling a greater sense of well-being and may include the use of oil, salt glows, heat lamps, and hydrotherapy. Massage therapy does not include diagnosis or treatment or use of procedures for which a license to practice medicine or surgery, chiropractic, or podiatry is required nor the use of microwave diathermy, shortwave diathermy, ultrasound, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation,electrical stimulation of over thirty-five volts, neurological hyperstimulation, or spinal and joint adjustments

Nevada

https://www.leg.state.nv.us/NRS/NRS-640C.html#NRS640CSec050


NRS 640C.060  “Massage therapy” defined.
      1.  “Massage therapy” means the application of a system of pressure to the muscular structure and soft tissues of the human body for therapeutic purposes, including, without limitation:
      (a) Effleurage;
      (b) Petrissage;
      (c) Tapotement;
      (d) Compressions;
      (e) Vibration;
      (f) Friction; and
      (g) Movements applied manually with or without superficial heat, cold, water or lubricants for the purpose of maintaining good health and establishing and maintaining good physical condition.
      2.  The term does not include:
      (a) Diagnosis, adjustment, mobilization or manipulation of any articulations of the body or spine; or

      (b) The demonstration of a product on a person that applies a system of pressure to the muscular structure and soft tissues of the human body, provided that the demonstration is not longer than 2 minutes.

New Hampshire

http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/XXX/328-B/328-B-mrg.htm


VI. “Massage” means the application of a system of structured touch which includes holding, pressure, positioning, or causing movement, by manual means, for the purpose of promoting, maintaining, and restoring the health and well-being of the client. Massage is designed to promote general relaxation, improve movement, relieve somatic and muscular pain or dysfunction, stress and muscle tension, and provide for general health enhancement, personal growth, and the organization, balance, and integration of the body.
VII. [Repealed.]
VIII. “Massage therapist” means a licensed individual who performs massage for compensation. Titles used may include: massage therapist, massage practitioner, bodywork practitioner, bodyworker, muscle therapist, massotherapist, or somatic therapist practitioner. A massage therapist uses visual, kinesthetic, and palpatory skills to assess the body, and may evaluate the client’s condition to the extent of determining whether massage is indicated or contraindicated.

New Jersey

https://www.njconsumeraffairs.gov/Statutes/massagelaw.pdf


“Massage and bodywork therapies” or “massage and bodywork” means systems of activity of structured touch which include, but are not limited to, holding, applying pressure, positioning and mobilizing soft tissue of the body by manual technique and use of visual, kinesthetic, auditory and palpating skills to assess the body for purposes of applying therapeutic massage and bodywork principles. Such application may include, but is not limited to, the use of therapies such as heliotherapy or hydrotherapy, the use of moist hot and cold external applications, explaining and describing myofascial movement, self-care and stress management as it relates to massage and bodywork therapies. Massage and bodywork therapy practices are designed to affect the soft tissue of the body for the purpose of promoting and maintaining the health and well-being of the client. Massage andbodywork therapies do not include the diagnosis of illness, disease, impairment or disability.

New Mexico

http://www.rld.state.nm.us/uploads/files/Massage%20Rule%20Book%2011_29_16.pdf


X.“Massage therapy”means the assessment and treatment of soft tissues and their dysfunctions for therapeutic purposes primarily for comfort and relief of pain. It is a health care service that includes gliding, kneading, percussion, compression, vibration, friction, nerve strokes, stretching the tissue and exercising the range of motion, and may include the use of oils, salt glows, hot or cold packs or hydrotherapy. Synonymous terms for massage therapy include massage, therapeutic massage, body massage, myomassage, bodywork, body rub or any derivation of those terms. Massage therapy is the deformation of soft tissues from more than one anatomical point by manual or mechanical means to accomplish homeostasis or pain relief in the tissues being deformed, as defined in the Massage Therapy Practice Act, NMSA 1978, Section 61-12C-3.E

New York

http://www.op.nysed.gov/prof/mt/article155.htm


§ 7801. Definition of practice of massage therapy.
The practice of the profession of massage therapy is defined as engaging in applying a scientific system of activity to the muscular structure of the human body by means of stroking, kneading, tapping and vibrating with the hands or vibrators for the purpose of improving muscle tone and circulation.

North Carolina

http://www.bmbt.org/downloads/PracticeAct/Practice%20Act%20With%20Revisions%2010-17.pdf


(3) Massage and bodywork therapy. Systems of activity applied to the soft tissues of the human body for therapeutic, educational, or relaxation purposes. The application may include:a. Pressure, friction, stroking, rocking, kneading, percussion, or passive or active stretching within the normal anatomical range of movement.b. Complementary methods, including the external application of water, heat, cold, lubricants, and other topical preparations.c. The use of mechanical devices that mimic or enhance actions that may possibly be done by the hands.

North Dakota

https://www.legis.nd.gov/cencode/t43c25.pdf


2.a.”Massage” means the practice of massage therapy by the manual application of a system of structured touch to the soft tissues of the human body, including:(1)Assessment, evaluation, or treatment;(2)Pressure, friction, stroking, rocking, gliding, kneading, percussion, or vibration;(3)Active or passive stretching of the body within the normal anatomical range of movement;(4)Use of manual methods or mechanical or electrical devices or tools that mimic or enhance the action of human hands;(5)Use of topical applications such as lubricants, scrubs, or herbal preparations; and(6)Use of hot or cold applications. b.Except as provided in this chapter, “massage” does not include diagnosis or other services that require a license to practice medicine or surgery, osteopathic medicine, chiropractic, occupational therapy, physical therapy, or podiatry and does not include service provided by professionals who act under their state-issued professional license, certification, or registration

Ohio

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/4731

(D) “Massage therapy” means the treatment of disorders of the human body by the manipulation of soft tissue through the systematic external application of massage techniques including touch, stroking, friction, vibration, percussion, kneading, stretching, compression, and joint movements within the normal physiologic range of motion; and adjunctive thereto, the external application of water, heat, cold, topical preparations, and mechanical devices.

Oklahoma

http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/cf_pdf/2015-16%20ENR/SB/SB687%20ENR.PDF


3. “Massage therapist” means an individual who practices massage or massage therapy and is licensed under the Massage Therapy Practice Act. A massage therapist uses visual, kinesthetic, and palpatory skills to assess the body and may evaluate a condition to the extent of determining whether massage is indicated or contraindicated;4. “Massage therapy” means the skillful treatment of the soft tissues of the human body. Massage is designed to promote general relaxation, improve movement, relieve somatic and muscular pain or dysfunction, stress and muscle tension, provide for general health enhancement, personal growth, education and the organization, balance and integration of the human body and includes, but is not limited to:a.the use of touch, pressure, friction, stroking, gliding, percussion, kneading, movement, positioning, holding, range of motion and nonspecific stretching within the normal anatomical range of movement, and vibration by manual or mechanical means with or without the use of massage devices that mimic or enhance manual measures, andb.the external application of ice, heat and cold packs for thermal therapy, water, lubricants, abrasives and external application of herbal or topical preparations not classified as prescription drugs; and

Oregon

https://www.oregonlegislature.gov/bills_laws/ors/ors687.html


Chapter 687 — Massage Therapists; Direct Entry Midwives
 
2017 EDITION
 
(3) “Manual” means the use of the hands, feet or any other part of the body in the performance of massage.
      (4)(a) “Massage,” “massage therapy” or “bodywork” means the use of pressure, friction, stroking, tapping or kneading on the human body, or the use of vibration or stretching on the human body by manual or mechanical means or gymnastics, with or without appliances such as vibrators, infrared heat, sun lamps or external baths, and with or without lubricants such as salts, powders, liquids or creams, for the purpose of, but not limited to, maintaining good health and establishing and maintaining good physical condition.
      (b) “Massage,” “massage therapy” and “bodywork” do not include the use of high-velocity, short-amplitude manipulative thrusting procedures to the articulations of the spine or extremities.
      (5)(a) “Massage facility” means a facility where a person engages in the practice of massage

Pennsylvania

https://www.dos.pa.gov/ProfessionalLicensing/BoardsCommissions/MassageTherapy/Documents/Applications%20and%20Forms/Non-Application%20Documents/MTM%20-%20Act%20118%20Amended%20Massage%20Therapy.pdf


“Massage therapy.” The application of a system of structured touch, pressure, movement, holding and treatment of the soft tissue manifestations of the human body in which the primary intent is to enhance the health and well-being of the client without limitation, except as provided in this act. The term includes the external application of water, heat, cold, lubricants or other topical preparations, lymphatic techniques, myofascial release techniques and the use of electro-mechanical devices which mimic or enhance the action of the massage techniques. The term does not include the diagnosis or treatment of impairment, illness, disease or disability, a medical procedure, a chiropractic manipulation – adjustment, physical therapy mobilization – manual therapy, therapeutic exercise, electrical stimulation, ultrasound or prescription of medicines for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, physical therapy, occupational therapy, podiatry or other practice of the healing arts is required. “Reflexology.” The physical act of using thumbs, fingers and hand techniques to apply specific pressure on the reflex area in the feet, hands or ears of the client

Rhode Island

http://webserver.rilin.state.ri.us/Statutes/TITLE23/23-20.8/23-20.8-1.HTM


(4) “Practice of massage” means the manual manipulation of the soft tissues of the human body through the systematic application of massage techniques including: effleurage, petrissage, compression, friction, vibration, percussion, pressure, positional holding, movement, range of motion for purposes of demonstrating muscle excursion or muscle flexibility, and nonspecific stretching. The term massage includes the external application of lubricants or other topical preparations, such as water, heat, and cold, via the use of the hand, foot, arm, or elbow, with or without the aid of massage devices, for the purpose of aiding muscle relaxation, reducing stress, improving circulation, increasing range of motion, relieving muscular pain, and the overall enhancement of health. Massage shall not include: the touch of genitalia; diagnosis of illness or disease; the prescribing of drugs, medicines, or exercise; high-velocity thrust applied to the joints or spine; electrical stimulation; application of ultrasound or any services or procedures for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, occupational therapy, physical therapy, or podiatry is required by law.

South Carolina

https://www.scstatehouse.gov/code/t40c030.php

(6) “Massage/bodywork therapy” means the application of a system of structured touch of the superficial tissues of the human body with the hand, foot, arm, or elbow whether or not the structured touch is aided by hydrotherapy, thermal therapy, a massage device, human hands, or the application to the human body of an herbal preparation.

South Dakota

http://sdlegislature.gov/Statutes/Codified_Laws/DisplayStatute.aspx?Type=Statute&Statute=36-35-1


CHAPTER 36-35

MASSAGE THERAPISTS
3)      “Massage,” the systematic mobilization of the soft tissues of the body through the application of hands, feet, or devices for the purposes of therapy, relaxation, or education through means which include:

             (a)      Pressure, friction, stroking, rocking, kneading, percussion, compression, or stretching;

             (b)      External application of water, heat, cold, lubricants, or other topical agents; or

             (c)      The use of devices that mimic or enhance the actions of human hands or feet; and

             (4)      “Practice of massage therapy,” the performance of massage for a fee or other compensation or holding oneself out to the public as performing massage.

Tennessee

https://law.justia.com/codes/tennessee/2010/title-63/chapter-18/part-1/63-18-102/


 (3)  “Massage/bodywork/somatic” means the manipulation of the soft tissues of the body with the intention of positively affecting the health and well being of the client;

Texas

https://www.tdlr.texas.gov/mas/maslaw.htm#455001

(8) “Massage therapy” means the manipulation of soft tissue by hand or through a mechanical or electrical apparatus for the purpose of body massage and includes effleurage (stroking), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (percussion), compression, vibration, friction, nerve strokes, and Swedish gymnastics. The terms “massage,” “therapeutic massage,” “massage technology,” “myotherapy,” “body massage,” “body rub,” or any derivation of those terms are synonyms for “massage therapy.”

Utah

https://le.utah.gov/xcode/Title58/Chapter47B/58-47b-S102.html?v=C58-47b-S102_1800010118000101


(6)”Practice of massage therapy” means: (a)the examination, assessment, and evaluation of the soft tissue structures of the body for the purpose of devising a treatment plan to promote homeostasis;
(b)the systematic manual or mechanical manipulation of the soft tissue of the body for the purpose of: (i)promoting the therapeutic health and well-being of a client;
(ii)enhancing the circulation of the blood and lymph;
(iii)relaxing and lengthening muscles;
(iv)relieving pain;
(v)restoring metabolic balance;
(vi)achieving homeostasis; or
(vii)other purposes;
(c)the use of the hands or a mechanical or electrical apparatus in connection with this Subsection (6);
(d)the use of rehabilitative procedures involving the soft tissue of the body;
(e)range of motion or movements without spinal adjustment as set forth in Section 58-73-102;
(f)oil rubs, heat lamps, salt glows, hot and cold packs, or tub, shower, steam, and cabinet baths;
(g)manual traction and stretching exercise;
(h)correction of muscular distortion by treatment of the soft tissues of the body;
(i)counseling, education, and other advisory services to reduce the incidence and severity of physical disability, movement dysfunction, and pain;
(j)similar or related activities and modality techniques;
(k)the practice described in this Subsection (6) on an animal to the extent permitted by: (i)Subsection 58-28-307(12); (ii)the provisions of this chapter; and (iii)division rule; or (l)
providing, offering, or advertising a paid service using the term massage or a derivative of the word massage, regardless of whether the service includes physical contact.

Virginia

http://www.dhp.virginia.gov/Nursing/nursing_faq.htm#massage


A “massage therapist” means a person who meets the qualifications specified in this chapter and who is currently licensed by the Board.
The practice of “massage therapy” means the treatment of soft tissues for therapeutic purposes by the application of massage and bodywork techniques based on the manipulation or application of pressure to the muscular structure or soft tissues of the human body. The term “massage therapy” does not include the diagnosis or treatment of illness or disease or any service or procedure for which a license to practice medicine, nursing, midwifery, chiropractic, physical therapy, occupational therapy, acupuncture, athletic training, or podiatry is required by law or any service described in § 54.1-3001(18).
“Massage therapy” shall not include manipulation of the spine or joints.

Washington

https://app.leg.wa.gov/wac/default.aspx?cite=246-830-005


(12) “Massage” and “massage therapy” mean a health care service involving the external manipulation or pressure of soft tissue for therapeutic purposes. Massage therapy includes techniques such as tapping, compressions, friction, reflexology, Swedish gymnastics or movements, gliding, kneading, shaking, and fascial or connective tissue stretching, with or without the aids of superficial heat, cold, water, lubricants, or salts. Massage therapy does not include diagnosis or attempts to adjust or manipulate any articulations of the body or spine or mobilization of these articulations by the use of thrusting force, nor does it include genital manipulation. See WAC 246-830-550 for additional limitations on massage practice.

West Virginia

http://www.wvmassage.org/rules.asp?show=state


(c) “Massage therapy” means a health care service which is a scientific and skillful manipulation of soft tissue for therapeutic or remedial purposes, specifically for improving muscle tone, circulation, promoting health and physical well-being. Massage therapy includes massage, myotherapy, massotherapy, bodywork, bodywork therapy, or therapeutic massage including hydrotherapy, superficial hot and cold applications, vibration and topical applications or other therapies which involve manipulation of the muscle and connective tissue of the body, for the purpose of enhancing health, reducing stress, improving circulation, aiding muscle relaxation, increasing range of motion, or relieving neuromuscular pain. Massage therapy does not include diagnosis or service which requires a license to practice medicine or surgery, osteopathic medicine, chiropractic, or podiatry, and does not include service performed by nurses, occupational therapists, or physical therapists who act under their own professional license,certificate or registration.

Wisconsin

https://docs.legis.wisconsin.gov/code/admin_code/mtbt/1.pdf


19)“Massage therapy or bodywork therapy” means the science and healing art that uses manual actions and adjunctive therapies to palpate and manipulate the soft tissue of the human body, in order to improve circulation, reduce tension, relieve soft tissue pain, or increase flexibility. Massage therapy or bodywork therapy includes determining whether manual actions and adjunctive therapies are appropriate. Massage therapy or bodywork therapy does not include making a medical, physical therapy, or chiropractic diagnosis

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