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Massage therapist scope of practice by state (A-M)

Alabama Massage Therapists Scope of Practice PDF accessed 10/20/2018

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE AND RELATED TOUCH THERAPY MODALITIES. The mobilization of the soft tissue which may include skin, fascia, tendons,ligaments, and muscles, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining good physical condition. The term shall include effleurage, petrissage, tapotement, compression, vibration, stretching, heliotherapy, superficial hot and cold applications, topical applications, or other therapy which involves movement either by hand, forearm, elbow, or foot, for the purpose of therapeutic massage. Massage therapy may include the external application and use of herbal or chemical preparations and lubricants such as salts, powders, liquids, nonprescription creams, mechanical devises such as T-bars, thumpers, body support systems, heat lamps, hot and cold packs, salt glow, steam cabinet baths or hydrotherapy.
The term includes any massage, movement therapy, massage technology, myotherapy, massotherapy, oriental massage techniques, structural integration, or polarity therapy. The term shall not include laser therapy, microwave, injection therapy, manipulation of the joints, or any diagnosis or treatment of an illness that normally involves the practice of medicine, chiropractic, physical therapy, podiatry, nursing, occupational therapy, veterinary, acupuncture, osteopathy, orthopedics, hypnosis, or naturopathics.

Alaska Massage Therapists Scope of Practice accessed 10/20/2018

https://www.commerce.alaska.gov/web/Portals/5/pub/MAS_Statutes.pdf

(5)”practice of massage therapy” means the provision, for compensation, of a service involving the systematic manipulation and treatment of the soft tissues, including the muscular and connective tissues of the human body, to enhance the functions of those tissues and promote relaxation and well-being; in this paragraph,”manipulation and treatment”
(A)includes manual techniques applied with the intent to physically affect local soft tissues, such as  pressure, friction, stroking, percussion, kneading, vibration, muscular assessment by palpation, range of motion for purposes of demonstrating muscle exertion for muscle flexibility, nonspecific stretching, and application of superficial heat, cold, water, lubricants, or salts;
(B)does not include diagnosis, the prescription of drugs or medicines, the practice of physical therapy, attempts to manipulate any articulation of the body or spine, or mobilization of these articulations by use of a thrusting force.

Arizona accessed 10/20/2018

https://www.azleg.gov/viewdocument/?docName=http://www.azleg.gov/ars/32/04201.htm

5. “Massage therapy” means the following that are undertaken to increase wellness, relaxation, stress reduction, pain relief and postural improvement or provide general or specific therapeutic benefits:

(a) The manual application of compression, stretch, vibration or mobilization of the organs and tissues beneath the dermis, including the components of the musculoskeletal system, peripheral vessels of the circulatory system and fascia, when applied primarily to parts of the body other than the hands, feet and head.

(b) The manual application of compression, stretch, vibration or mobilization using the forearms, elbows, knees or feet or handheld mechanical or electrical devices.

(c) Any combination of range of motion, directed, assisted or passive movements of the joints.

(d) Hydrotherapy, including the therapeutic applications of water, heat, cold, wraps, essential oils, skin brushing, salt glows and similar applications of products to the skin.

6. “Practice of massage therapy” means the application of massage therapy to any person for a fee or other consideration. Practice of massage therapy does not include the diagnosis of illness or disease, medical procedures, naturopathic manipulative medicine, osteopathic manipulative medicine, chiropractic adjustive procedures, homeopathic neuromuscular integration, electrical stimulation, ultrasound, prescription of medicines or the use of modalities for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, nursing, occupational therapy, athletic training, physical therapy, acupuncture or podiatry is required by law

Arkansas accessed 10/20/2018

https://www.healthy.arkansas.gov/images/uploads/pdf/Arkansas_Massage_Therapy_Law_2017.pdf

9.(A)“Massage therapy”means the treatment of soft tissues, which may include skin, fascia, and muscles and their dysfunctions for therapeutic purposes of establishing and maintaining good physical condition, comfort,
and relief of pain.
(B) “Massage therapy” is a health care service that includes gliding, kneading,percussion, compression, vibration, friction, nerve strokes, and stretching the tissue.
(C) “Massage therapy” also means to engage in the practice of any of the following procedures:
(i) Massage therapy techniques and procedures, either hands-on or with mechanical devices;
(ii) Therapeutic application and use of oils, herbal or chemical preparations, lubricants, nonprescription creams, lotions, scrubs, powders, and other spa services;
(iii) Therapeutic application of hot or cold packs;
(iv) Hydrotherapy techniques, which means the use of water in any form for therapeutic purposes and includes methods of full and partial immersion baths, whirlpools, sponging, sprays, body shampoos, body scrubs, body wraps, fomentations, compresses, poultices, packs, masks, steam treatments, and sauna treatments.
(v) Heliotherapy, which may include mechanical devices, heat lamps, and other devices;
(a)Heliotherapy means the use of light for therapeutic purposes and may consist of the use of infrared radiation lamps and devices and the various uses of other light that might be approved by the Department.
(vi) Electrotherapy;which means the use of electrical devices for therapeutic purposes and may consist of the use of mechanical vibrators, electric stimulation, direct and alternating currents, interferential currents, micro currents, and Russian stimulation. Therapists must demonstrate training in the use of electrical devices other than simple mechanical vibrators and present qualifications acceptable to the Department before using such
devices.
(vii) Any hands-on bodywork techniques and procedures rising to the level of the techniques and procedures intended to be regulated under this chapter and not covered under specific licensing laws of other boards;
D. The following are not included in the scope of massage therapy practice:
(i) Colonic irrigation and other methods of internal hydrotherapy;
(ii) Depilation, waxing, extractions, and electrolysis;
(iii)Practices involving the use of ultrasound, unless the therapist can present educational qualifications acceptable to the Department and a licensed physician prescribes the treatment;

 California  (Information needed)

Colorado

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-K5DhxXxJZbdHJIdTljekhFZlk/view

“Massage” or “massage therapy” means a system of structured touch, palpation, or movement of the soft tissue of another person’s body in order to enhance or restore the general health and well-being of the recipient. Such system includes, but is not limited to, techniques such as effleurage, commonly called stroking or gliding; petrissage, commonly called kneading; tapotement or percussion; friction; vibration; compression; passive and active stretching within the normal anatomical range of movement; hydromassage; and thermal massage. Such techniques may be applied with or without the aid of lubricants, salt or herbal preparations, water, heat, or a massage device that mimics or enhances the actions possible by human hands.

Connecticut

https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/Departments-and-Agencies/DPH/dph/practitioner_licensing_and_investigations/plis/massagetherapist/MSGStatutepdf.pdf?la=en

(d)”Massage therapy” means the systematic and scientific manipulation and treatment of the soft tissues of the body, by use of pressure, friction, stroking, percussion, kneading, vibration by manual or mechanical means, range of motion and nonspecific stretching. Massage therapy may include the use of oil, ice, hot and cold packs, tub, shower, steam, dry heat, or cabinet baths, for the purpose of, but not limited to, maintaining good health and establishing and maintaining good physical and mental condition. Massage therapy does not encompass (1) diagnosis, the prescribing of drugs or medicines, spinal or other joint manipulations, (2) any service or procedure for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, natureopathy, physical therapy, or podiatry is required by law, or (3) Thai yoga practiced by a person who is registered as a yoga teacher with the Yoga Alliance Registry and has completed two hundred hours of training in Thai yoga.

Delaware

http://delcode.delaware.gov/title24/c053/sc01/index.shtml
(7) ”Practice of massage and bodywork” shall mean a system of structured touch applied to the superficial or deep tissue, muscle, or connective tissue, by applying pressure with manual means. Such application may include, but is not limited to, friction, gliding, rocking, tapping, kneading, or nonspecific stretching, whether or not aided by massage oils or the application of hot and cold treatments. The practice of massage and bodywork is designed to promote general relaxation, enhance circulation, improve joint mobilization and/or relieve stress and muscle tension, and to promote a general sense of well-being.

 District of Columbia

https://dchealth.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/doh/publication/attachments/Massage%20Therapy%20Regulations%2010-6-2017%20%28004%29.pdf
7510SCOPE OF PRACTICE7510.1
A massage therapist or any person so authorized under the Act to perform massage therapy may perform therapeutic maneuvers in which the practitioner applies massage techniques, including use of the hand or limb, by applying touch and pressure to the human body. Such techniques include, but are not limited to the following:
(a)Stroking,(including but not limited to Effluerage);
(b)Kneading, (including but not limited to Petrissage);(c)Tapping, (including but not limited to Tapotement);
(d)Flexibility training, (including but not limited to stretching, strengthening, and manual traction);
(e)Compression;
(f)Vibration;
(g)Friction;
(h)Application of heat, cold, and water;
(i)Non-prescription drug applications, (including mild abrasives) for the purpose of improving circulation, enhancing muscle relaxation, relieving muscle pain, reducing stress, or promotion health; or
(j)Holding, positioning, or causing movement of an individual’s body.
7510.2Massage therapy does not include incidental use of soft tissue manipulation while primarily engaging in another technique or modality in which a practitioner is qualified

Florida

http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&Search_String=&URL=0400-0499/0480/Sections/0480.033.html

480.033

(3) “Massage” means the manipulation of the soft tissues of the human body with the hand, foot, arm, or elbow, whether or not such manipulation is aided by hydrotherapy, including colonic irrigation, or thermal therapy; any electrical or mechanical device; or the application to the human body of a chemical or herbal preparation.

Georgia

http://sos.ga.gov/plb/acrobat/Laws/50_Massage_Therapists_43-24APracticeAct.pdf

(8) “Massage therapy” means the application of a system of structured touch,pressure, movement, and holding to the soft tissue of the body in which the primary intent is to enhance or restore health and well-being. The term includes complementary methods, including without limitation the external application of water, superficial heat, superficial cold, lubricants, salt scrubs, or other topical preparations and the use of commercially available electromechanical devices which do not require the use of transcutaneous electrodes and which mimic or enhance the actions possible by the hands; the term also includes determining whether massage therapy is appropriate or contraindicated, or whether referral to another health care provider is appropriate. Massage therapy shall not include the use of ultrasound,fluidotherapy, laser, and other methods of deep thermal modalities.

Hawaii

https://cca.hawaii.gov/pvl/files/2013/04/HRS_452-0616.pdf

Massage”, “massage therapy”, and “Hawaiian massage” commonly known as lomilomi, means any method of treatment of the superficial soft parts of the body, consisting of rubbing, stroking, tapotement, pressing, shaking, or kneading with the hands, feet, elbow, or arms, and whether or not aided by any mechanical or electrical apparatus, appliances, or supplementary aids such as rubbing alcohol, liniments, antiseptics, oils, powder, creams, lotions, ointments, or other similar preparations commonly used in this practice. Any mechanical or electrical apparatus used as described in this chapter shall be approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration

Idaho

TITLE 54  PROFESSIONS, VOCATIONS, AND BUSINESSES CHAPTER 40  MASSAGE THERAPISTS 54-4002
6)  “Massage therapy” means the care and services provided by a massage therapist.
(7)  “Practice of massage therapy” means the application of a system of structured touch, pressure, movement and holding of the soft tissues of the human body. The application may include:
(a)  Pressure, friction, stroking, rocking, kneading, percussion, or passive or active stretching within the normal anatomical range of movement;
(b)  Complementary methods, including the external application of water, heat, cold, lubricants and other topical preparations; or
(c)  The use of mechanical devices that mimic or enhance actions that may be done by the hands.

Illinois

http://ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=2469&ChapAct=225%26nbsp%3BILCS%26nbsp%3B57%2F&ChapterID=24&ChapterName=PROFESSIONS+AND+OCCUPATIONS&ActName=Massage+Licensing+Act%2E
PROFESSIONS, OCCUPATIONS, AND BUSINESS OPERATIONS
(225 ILCS 57/) Massage Licensing Act.
"Massage" or "massage therapy" means a system of structured palpation or
movement of the soft tissue of the body. The system may include, but is
not limited to, techniques such as effleurage or stroking and gliding,
petrissage or kneading, tapotement or percussion, friction, vibration,
compression, and stretching activities as they pertain to
massage therapy. These techniques may be applied by a licensed massage
therapist
with or without the aid of lubricants, salt or herbal preparations,
hydromassage, thermal massage, or a massage device that mimics or enhances the
actions possible by human hands.
The purpose of the practice of massage, as licensed under this Act, is to
enhance the general
health and well-being of the mind and body of the recipient. "Massage"
does not include the
diagnosis of a specific
pathology. "Massage" does not include those acts of physical therapy or
therapeutic or corrective measures that are outside the scope of massage
therapy practice as defined in this Section.

Indiana

http://iga.in.gov/legislative/laws/2017/ic/titles/25/#25-21.8-1
IC 25-21.8-1-4“Massage therapy”

Sec. 4. “Massage therapy”:

(1) means a health care service involving the external manipulation or pressure of soft tissue for the purposes of enhancing health, providing muscle relaxation, increasing range of motion, reducing stress, relieving pain, or improving circulation of the human body;

(2) includes:

(A) the use of touch, external pressure, friction, stroking, rocking, gliding, vibration, percussion, kneading, movement, positioning, nonspecific stretching, stretching within the normal anatomical range of movement, and holding, with or without the use of massage devices that mimic or enhance manual measures; and

(B) the external application of heat, cold, water, ice, stones, lubricants, abrasives, and topical preparations that are not classified as prescription drugs; and

(3) does not include:

(A) spinal manipulation or grade 5 mobilization referred to in IC 25-10-1-14; and

(B) diagnosis or prescribing drugs for which a license is required.

Iowa

https://www.legis.iowa.gov/docs/code/2019/152C.1.pdf

1MASSAGETHERAPY,§152C.1

3.“Massagetherapy” means performance for compensation of massage,myotherapy, massotherapy, bodywork, bodywork therapy, or therapeutic massage including hydrotherapy, superficial hot and cold applications,vibration and topical applications,or other therapy which involves manipulation of the muscle and connective tissue of the body,excluding osseous tissue,to treat the muscle tonus system for the purpose of enhancing health, muscle relaxation,increasing range of motion,reducing stress, relieving pain,or improving circulation.

4.“Reflexology”means manipulation of the soft tissues of the human body which is restricted to the hands,feet,or ears,performed by persons who do not hold themselves out to be massage therapists or to be performing massage therapy.

 Kentucky

http://bmt.ky.gov/Laws%20and%20Regulations/Laws%20and%20Regulations%20Booklet.pdf

6 . “Polarity therapy” means diverse applications affecting the human energy system. These applications include energetic approaches to somatic contact, verbal facilitation, nutrition, exercise, and health education. Polarity therapy does not make medical claims, diagnose physical ailments, or allow prescription of medications. Standards for schools, education, and practice, the administration of a code of ethics, and a registration process are provided by the American Polarity Therapy Association;
(7) “Practice of massage therapy” means the application, by a massage therapist licensed by the board, of a system of structured touch, pressure, movement, and holding to the soft tissues of the human body with the intent to enhance or restore the health and well-being of the client. The practice includes the external application of water, heat, cold, lubricants, salt scrubs, or other topical preparations; use of electromechanical devices that mimic or enhance the actions of the hands; and determination of whether massage therapy is appropriate or contraindicated, or whether referral to another health care practitioner is appropriate; and
(8) “Trager Approach” means a form of movement education that uses subtle directed movements and the skilled touch of a practitioner. The Trager Approach combines physical movement with sensory awareness and internal imagery designed to increase the client’s self-awareness and generate physiological changes in the body tissues so as to allow the client to experience a new way of moving his or her body. The practice is federally trademarked.

Louisiana

https://www.labmt.org/uploads/LaRS37.3551etseqUpdated01.25.2019.pdf

La. R.S. 37:3551, et seq.CHAPTER 57. MASSAGE THERAPISTS AND ESTABLISHMENTS
(10) “Practice of massage therapy” means the manipulation of soft tissue for the purpose of maintaining good health and establishing and maintaining good physical condition. The practice of massage therapy shall include advertising or offering to engage in the practice of massage therapy and holding oneself out or designating oneself to the public as a massage therapist or massage establishment. The practice of massage therapy shall include effleurage (stroking), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (percussion), compression, vibration, friction (active/passive range of motion), stretching activities as they pertain to massage therapy, Shiatsu, acupressure, reflexology, trigger point massage, and Swedish massage either by hand, forearm, elbow, foot, or with mechanical appliances for the purpose of body massage. Massage therapy may include the use of lubricants such as salts, powders, liquids, creams with the exception of prescriptive or medicinal creams, heat lamps, hot and cold stones, whirlpool, hot and cold packs, salt glow, body wraps, or steam cabinet baths. It shall not include electrotherapy, laser therapy, microwave, colonic therapy, injection therapy, or manipulation of the joints. Equivalent terms for massage therapy are massage, therapeutic massage, massage technology, body work, or any derivation of those terms. As used in this Chapter, the terms “therapy” and “therapeutic” shall not include diagnosis, the treatment of illness or disease, or any service or procedure for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, physical therapy, or podiatry is required by law.

Maine

http://www.mainelegislature.org/legis/statutes/32/title32sec14301.html

Title 32: PROFESSIONS AND OCCUPATIONS
Chapter 127: MASSAGE THERAPISTS
4. Massage therapy.  “Massage therapy” means a scientific or skillful manipulation of soft tissue for therapeutic or remedial purposes, specifically for improving muscle tone and circulation and promoting health and physical well-being. The term includes, but is not limited to, manual and mechanical procedures for the purpose of treating soft tissue only, the use of supplementary aids such as rubbing alcohol, liniments, oils, antiseptics, powders, herbal preparations, creams or lotions, procedures such as oil rubs, salt glows and hot or cold packs or other similar procedures or preparations commonly used in this practice. This term specifically excludes manipulation of the spine or articulations and excludes sexual contact as defined in Title 17-A, section 251, subsection 1, paragraph D.

Maryland

https://health.maryland.gov/massage/Documents/6-101.pdf

HEALTH OCCUPATIONS TITLE 6. MASSAGE THERAPYSUBTITLE1. DEFINITIONS;GENERALPROVISIONS.Md. HEALTH OCCUPATIONS Code Ann. § 6-101 (2017)
(f) Massage therapy. — (1) “Massage therapy” means the use of manual techniques on soft tissues of the human body including effleurage (stroking), petrissage (kneading), tapotement (tapping), stretching, compression, vibration, and friction, with or without the aid of heat limited to hot packs and heating pads, cold water, or nonlegend topical applications, for the purpose of improving circulation, enhancing muscle relaxation, relieving muscular pain, reducing stress, or promoting health and well-being. (2) “Massage therapy” includes the laying on of hands, consisting of pressure or movement on an individual who is fully clothed, except for footwear, to specifically affect the electromagnetic energy or energetic field of the human body if this practice includes use of the manual techniques set forth in paragraph (1) of this subsection. (3) “Massage therapy” does not include:

(i) The diagnosis or treatment of illness, disease, or injury;(ii) The adjustment, manipulation, or mobilization of any of the articulations of the osseous structures of the human body or spine; or(iii) Except as provided in paragraph (2) of this subsection, the laying on of hands, consisting of pressure or movement on an individual who is fully clothed, except for footwear, to specifically affect the electromagnetic energy or energetic field of the human body. (4) The provisions of paragraph (3) of this subsection do not preclude the application of the modalities described in paragraph (1) of this subsection to an individual who has an injury.

 Massachusetts

https://www.mass.gov/files/documents/2017/10/26/269cmr2.pdf
269 CMR: BOARD OF REGISTRATION OF MASSAGE THERAPY 269 CMR 2.00: DEFINITIONS Section 2.01: Definitions
Massage: The systematic treatment of the soft tissues of the body by use of pressure, friction, stroking, percussion, kneading, vibration by manual or mechanical means, range of motion for purposes of demonstrating muscle excursion or muscle flexibility and nonspecific stretching. Massage therapy may include the use of oil, ice, hot and cold packs, tub, shower, steam, dry heat or cabinet baths, in which the primary intent is to enhance or restore the health and well-being of the client. Massage therapy shall not include diagnoses of illness or disease, the prescribing of drugs or medicines, high-velocity, low amplitude thrust applied to the joint, electrical stimulation, application of ultrasound, exercise, spinal or other joint manipulations or any services or procedures for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, occupational therapy, physical therapy or podiatry is required by law. Massage Therapy also shall not include the practice of a person who uses touch, words or directed movement to deepen awareness of the patterns of movement in the body, or the affectation of the human energy system or acupoints or Qimeridians of the human body while engaged within the scope of practice of a profession with established standards and ethics, including, but not limited to, the Feldenkrais Method, Reflexology, The Trager Approach, Ayurvedic Therapies, Rolf Structural Integration, Polarity or Polarity Therapy, Polarity Therapy Bodywork, Asian Bodywork Therapy that does no t constitute Massage as defined in M.G.L. c. 135, Acupressure, Jin Shin Do, Qi Gong, Tui Na, Shiatsu, Body-mind Centering and Reiki. For purposes of 269 CMR et seq., the use of the term “Massage” shall also mean the term “Massage therapy”.

Michigan

http://www.legislature.mi.gov/(S(ckps25o3nykz0p2x2oak2cpc))/mileg.aspx?page=getObject&objectName=mcl-333-17951

PUBLIC HEALTH CODE (EXCERPT)
Act 368 of 1978   333.17951 Definitions.

(c) “Polarity therapy” means diverse applications affecting the human energy system and includes energetic approaches to somatic contact, verbal facilitation, nutrition, exercise, and health education. Polarity therapy does not make medical claims, diagnose physical ailments, or allow prescription of medications.

(d) “Practice of massage therapy” means the application of a system of structured touch, pressure, movement, and holding to the soft tissue of the human body in which the primary intent is to enhance or restore the health and well-being of the client. Practice of massage therapy includes complementary methods, including the external application of water, heat, cold, lubrication, salt scrubs, body wraps, or other topical preparations; and electromechanical devices that mimic or enhance the actions possible by the hands. Practice of massage therapy does not include medical diagnosis; practice of physical therapy; high-velocity, low-amplitude thrust to a joint; electrical stimulation; application of ultrasound; or prescription of medicines.

f) “Trager approach” means a form of movement education that uses subtle directed movements and the skilled touch of a practitioner. The Trager approach combines physical movement with sensory awareness and internal imagery designed to increase the client’s self-awareness and generate physiological changes in the body tissues so as to allow the client to experience a new way of moving his or her body.

 Mississippi

 https://www.msbmt.ms.gov/Documents/HB.905.As.Approved.By.The.Governor.3.8.2018.pdf
https://www.msbmt.ms.gov/Documents/MSBMT.Rules.2017.Final.6.30.2017.pdf
TITLE 30 PROFESSIONS AND VOCATIONSPART 2501
S) “Massage” means touch, stroking, kneading, stretching, friction, percussion and vibration, and incfudes holding, positioning, causing movement of the soft tissues and applying manual touch and pressure to the body (excluding an osseous tissue manipulation or adjustment). “Therapy” means action aimed at achieving or increasing health and wellness.
“Massage therapy” means the profession in which the practitioner applies massage techniques with the intent of positively affecting the health and well-being of the client, and may adjunctively
(i) apply alljed modalities, heat, co1d, water and topical preparations not. classified as prescription drugs, (ii) use hand held tools such as electric hand massagers used adjunctively to the application of hand massage or devices designed as t-bars or knobbies, and (iii) instruct self-care and stress management. “Manual” means by use of hand or body

 Missouri

http://revisor.mo.gov/main/OneSection.aspx?section=324.240
  Chapter 324

  324.240.  Definitions.

(7)  “Massage therapy”, a health care profession which involves the treatment of the body’s tonus system through the scientific or skillful touching, rubbing, pressing or other movements of the soft tissues of the body with the hands, forearms, elbows, or feet, or with the aid of mechanical apparatus, for relaxation, therapeutic, remedial or health maintenance purposes to enhance the mental and physical well-being of the client, but does not include the prescription of medication, spinal or joint manipulation, the diagnosis of illness or disease, or any service or procedure for which a license to practice medicine, chiropractic, physical therapy, or podiatry is required by law, or to those occupations defined in chapter 329;

Montana

https://leg.mt.gov/bills/mca/title_0370/chapter_0330/part_0040/section_0030/0370-0330-0040-0030.html

(4) (a) (i) ”Massage therapy” when provided by a massage therapist means the application of a system of structured touch, pressure, positioning, or holding to soft tissues of the body, Swedish massage, effleurage, petrissage, tapotement, percussion, friction, vibration, compression, passive and active stretching or movement within the normal anatomical range of motion, the external application of water, heat, cold, lubricants, salts, skin brushing, or other topical preparations not classified as prescription drugs, providing information for self-care stress management, and the determination of whether massage is contraindicated and whether referral to another health care practitioner is recommended.

(ii) The techniques described in subsection (4)(a)(i) must be applied by the massage therapist through the use of hands, forearms, elbows, knees, or feet or through the use of hand-held tools that mimic or support the action of the hands and are primarily intended to enhance or restore health and well-being by promoting pain relief, stress reduction, and relaxation.

(b) The term does not include providing examinations for the purpose of diagnosis, providing treatments that are outside the scope of massage therapy, attempts to adjust, manipulate, or mobilize any articulations of the body or spine by the use of high-velocity, low-amplitude thrusting force, exercise, exercise instruction or prescription, or the use of tape when applied to restrict joint movement, manual or mechanical traction when applied to the spine or extremities for the purposes of joint mobilization or manipulation, injection therapy, laser therapy, microwave diathermy, electrical stimulation, ultrasound, iontophoresis, or phonophoresis.

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